Sports Nutrition

Photo taken by Sydney Balotin

When running in a game, do you ever feel so tired and weak you just want a substitution? That’s because you didn’t fuel your body with the right foods before hand. Eating lots of protein and carbs on the day of the game won’t help your energy and stamina. It all depends on what you eat a day or two before.

“Eating lots of protein and carbs on the day of the game won’t help your energy and stamina. It all depends on what you eat a day or two before.”

According to wcusc.org, the reason you feel nauseous right after eating a lot prior to game is because when working out, your blood rushes to the working muscles instead of your stomach.  You end up being left with undigested food in you stomach, causing people to feel sick.

Senior Alan Gao recommends drinking a gallon of water a day to be properly hydrated. “I want to keep my routine at a gallon a day or 128 fluid ounces… it’s all about consistency,” he says. If you don’t drink a lot of water, you could have headaches and feel weak throughout your game.

Junior Skyler Hardt, a member of the Jamesville-DeWitt Varsity volleyball team says hydration is just as important as food. “I think for any sport being hydrated is really important,” she says.  Hardt talked about how even volleyball players suffer with the effects of dehydration. “Personally I get headaches if I’m dehydrated, so hydration is key.” Hardt explains.

Everyone knows that it is important to take in nutrition before games, but what most people don’t know is that post-game nutrition is also essential to being a well performing athlete. Gao explained a special drink he has after races. “I use this thing called R4 Endurox. It has a four to one carb to protein ratio… it’s just the ideal ratio for recovery.” Gao said. Cross Country and track Coach, Emily Rowles, agrees. “Always [eat foods with] protein within 30 minutes of finishing, [it] helps [with] recovery,” said Coach Rowles.

“So overall, staying away from desserts and oily foods will benefit you in the long run.”

J-DHS teams have pasta dinners because pasta, bread, and salad are all filled with carbohydrates, allowing athletes to gain lots of energy for the next day’s meet or game. “Pasta is great, sauce is great, salad is awesome, especially salad with lots of colorful things inside, but avoid lots of desserts,” said Rowles. There are also many options for people who are vegan or gluten free. Hardt is gluten free and she explains she mostly goes for salad and sometimes meatballs to give her the energy she needs. Fruit is also a good option because it is rich in carbohydrates.

It is always important to keep up with what you eat during the season as well as out of the season, but make sure to not be too strict. “I think you are people and you are kids and you need to eat like you’re people and kids, just with moderation and regulations,” explains Rowles. So overall, staying away from desserts and oily foods will benefit you in the long run. “Stay away from super heavy desserts and anything that’s super sugary and not super good for you,” Hardt says.

Throughout the duration of your athletic season, consuming proper nutrition is necessary in order to have an excellent performance.